Executive Master in Cybersecurity

Strategy is the best Security

The Critical Challenge Project (CCP) is central to the Executive Master’s in Cybersecurity. The project identifies a critical cybersecurity challenge for an organization, drawing from the student’s own work experience. Under the direction of a faculty member, the student analyzes this critical challenge from multiple perspectives and develops a comprehensive plan for addressing it. The CCP draws upon the knowledge and skills gained by the student from each of the EMCS courses, with particular emphasis on integrating technology, policy, and human factor aspects, considering ethical implications, and developing innovative, transformative, and viable solutions. The CCP is expected to be relevant to the student in terms of background, interests, current job, and future aspirations. Also, it should have practical applicability to the field of cybersecurity and take into account multiple stakeholders, such as consumers, developers, policymakers, and government and industry executives.

Executive Master of Healthcare Leadership

Transforming Leaders. Transforming Healthcare. 

The Critical Challenge Project (CCP) course is an independent project that spans the duration of the Executive Master of Healthcare Leadership (EMHL) program. Each student identifies a critical challenge related to healthcare upon applying to the Executive Master of Healthcare Leadership program; the challenge could relate to his/her organization or to a personal interest. Throughout EMHL, each student works collaboratively with a variety of people including their EMHL peers, professional colleagues, course faculty, advisors, and chairs, integrating various perspectives across healthcare sectors to develop possible solutions to his or her challenge.

Students draw upon knowledge and skills from their coursework with particular emphasis on collaborating across healthcare sectors, considering ethical implications, communicating effectively, and developing innovative, transformative, creative, and viable solutions. In addition, students think critically about their challenges throughout their coursework, leveraging course assignments to make progress on discreet components of their critical challenge project, including development of their strategic plan, business plan, and quality improvement plan. Students relate other assignments, as appropriate, to their CCPs.

Key principles students use to define their CCPs include:

  • Relevant – meaningful to the student in terms of background, interests, current job, future aspirations, and/or organization
  • Consequential – project is broad enough scope to have an impact on stakeholders across the healthcare industry, including patients, providers, and payers
  • Realistic – feasible and viable set of steps and expectations within the 16-month program (the overarching challenge does not need to be resolved within the program, but measurable progress toward the defined CCP must be reasonable and appropriate)
  • Measurable – contains measurable outcomes of success

Executive Master in Science and Technology Leadership

Broaden Your Impact

At Brown we believe in the rigorous application of theory to practice. The Critical Challenge Project (CCP) course – an independent project that spans the duration of the Executive Master in Science and Technology Leadership (EMSTL) program – embodies this ethos. When applying to the EMSTL program, each student identifies a critical challenge related to their industry or workplace, drawing from his/her own experience and vision for the future of their industry. This critical challenge becomes the focus of the “Critical Challenge Project” throughout the 16-month program. Each student is matched with an advisor, based on their professional expertise and interests. The advisor serves as a mentor and an expert resource for the student, monitoring the student’s progress and evaluating the project.

The student develops and completes the project using resources available through the program, including the courses and course assignments; interaction with peers and faculty, including the Advisor; and the other resources the student identifies for the project.

Key principles students use to define their CCPs include:

  • Relevant – meaningful to the student in teams of background, interests, current job, future aspirations, and/or organization.
  • Consequential  a project of broad enough scope to have an impact on stakeholders across science and technology industries.
  • Realistic – feasible and viable set of steps and expectations within the 16-month program (The overarching challenge does not need to be resolved within the program, but measurable progress toward the defined CCP must be reasonable and appropriate).
  • Measurable – contains measureable outcomes of success.
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